• Join our Mailing List!

    Get access to free study tips, learning strategies, and other valuable resources for your child or student.
Topic Archives: 21st Century Skills & Flexible Thinking

Do Parents Really Need a United Front?

March 23, 2017

Nancy Weinstein offers a mother’s contrarian view, admittedly developed out of desperation A common theme in child psychology is the importance of presenting children with a united front when it comes to rules, discipline and behavior. If Dad says it, Mom needs to back him up. And vice versa. Otherwise, as the psychological research tells us, children will feel confused and conflicted rather than getting the clear structure and reliable rules they need to feel safe and secure. According to Laurence Steinberg, Ph.D., author of The Ten Basic Principles of Good Parenting, “My advice is that if your child is not yet eleven or so, you and your spouse should do what you can to present a united front. It will make life… Read More

Leave a Comment

How to Get Kids to Do What You Want

February 15, 2017

Without question the best way to get kids, all kids, to do what you want them to do is… Let them choose. If this is a new concept to you and you are dealing with a teenager I’m not going to guarantee it will work the first time. However, after a few trials you are likely to discover why this approach, while perhaps against our most visceral impulses, is far more effective than asking, telling or demanding a child to do what you want. Why it works? Quite simply, choice empowers. When students choose, they take responsibility, and when they take responsibility they follow through. Glorious isn’t it? Ok, so it doesn’t always work perfectly. But as you get more comfortable letting… Read More

Leave a Comment

News Fatigue: Supporting Students in Challenging Times

February 2, 2017

by Nancy Weinstein Is there anyone not feeling news fatigue? It’s hard to watch and yet you must. If you are a parent or teacher the challenges are compounded. Quite simply, you can’t hide kids from the news. And lest we forget, kids are not little adults. In most cases, they are not socially, emotionally and intellectually ready to process the drama, trauma, and full implications of what they are hearing, seeing and reading. Our solution: business news. Yes, business news. The networks like CNBC, Bloomberg TV, and Fox Business that cover the daily markets. While their programming of charts, graphs, and, let’s face it, [mostly] men in suits might not garner the same enthusiasm of general news, you can rely on them for factual, bi-partisan information across… Read More

Leave a Comment

Play Hard, Study Hard Science Tells Us

November 30, 2016

Researchers from University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine Brain Behavior Lab evaluated nearly 10,000 children ages 8 to 21. They began with fMRI scans and then moved to an online assessment to analyze brain development at every age. Their data is fascinating. And it gives powerful insight into what we should generally expect from children behaviorally, emotionally and cognitively at every age. And here’s why we should all care. A lot. Childhood is a period of rapid brain development. That much we’ve known. What is different about the research from the Brain Behavior Lab is that it might tell us what students should learn for the greatest possible long-term impact. From Dr. Robert Bjork we’ve known that students shouldn’t be coasting and they shouldn’t be stretched too far beyond their… Read More

Leave a Comment

Where We Go from Here (35 Strategies to Develop a Growth Mindset)

November 15, 2016

by Mindprint Staff We get better. As parents and teachers, our path to better is often through the love and laughter of our children. On the other hand, children model the behavior of the grown-ups around them. Our children are watching. We need to mirror the mindset we want them to have, if they are to become the grown-ups that will make the world a better place. Educators know the power of growth mindset, or the fundamental importance of having a positive attitude and response to our successes as well as our disappointments. Now more than ever is the time for adults to model growth mindset. Yes, we are facing many big issues that might feel insurmountable. However, if we want the world to get better we can start small, or at least with the small… Read More

Leave a Comment

The Best Educational Family Games for the Holidays

September 26, 2016

Looking for non-digital options to keep kids learning and entertained?! You’ve landed in the right place. And we provide you with the perspective you need to decide if it will be a good fit for each unique learner.   Plyt Why We Like It: Plyt is an effective board game to help students develop critical skills in mental math calculations and numerical fluency. It is simple, yet fun despite being a purely educational game making it great for home or the classroom, especially since games can be relatively quick while still providing plenty of effective practice. Game can grow with a child developmentally, from learning basic addition to challenging multi-step mental math problems. Develops: Processing Speed, Working Memory Considerations: Requires an adult to guide children on playing… Read More

Leave a Comment

How to “Crush School”

July 20, 2016

by Mindprint Staff There’s a new book coming out this month, that might just have the missing ingredient to increase student motivation and efficiency. The author, Oskar Cymerman, is a high school chemistry teacher. If you have any doubt of his ability to understand and motivate teenagers, just know that this year he will become the first teacher in his school to “Starbucks” his classroom. Here are excerpts from our conversation with Oskar about his forthcoming book: Mindprint: Why did you decide to write your book “Crush School“? Oskar: I wrote the book to help students learn how to learn. As teachers, we tell students how to learn or study, and while many of these strategies are effective, we rarely… Read More

Leave a Comment

‘New Skool’: Digital Learning Options You’ll Love

July 12, 2016

Looking for what’s new, different and fun to keep kids learning and entertained?! You’ve landed in the right place. Check out our teachers’ favorite collection digital options that teach AND engage. And we provide you with the unique perspective you need to decide if it will be a good fit for each unique learner. Find non-digital options here.     iCivics Free Website, App Why We Like It: These free well-designed games, developed by Justice Sandra Day O’Connor’s foundation, are a fantastic option to teach students about legislative and judicial processes. Each game teaches students a significant amount about the branches of government through a combination of story-telling and gamification. There are nine different games on the site, so parents should be able to find one that will be of interest… Read More

Leave a Comment

Mindprint Exclusive: Observation Checklist for Learning Struggles

June 28, 2016

This is one of many exclusive Mindprint guides found in the FREE Parent & Teacher Resources section of the Mindprint website. We hope it makes it easier for you to identify the source of your child’s struggles. If you’re looking for more detailed insight, consider a confidential Comprehensive Mindprint. Once you know the source of a child’s difficulties, search our free Toolbox to find research-backed strategies to support a struggling learner.

Leave a Comment

Give Her Wings

May 18, 2016

By Nancy Weinstein Last weekend my daughter flew. It was her Bat Mitzvah, and she owned it from start to finish. From her preparation, to planning the party, to conducting the service, to showing the grace and poise as a hostess that one rarely sees in a 13 year old. Unlike most parents on such a special occasion, I didn’t cry. I glowed. I had cried too many tears already. As the saying goes, “What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger.” At times I think my daughter is the strongest person I know. But getting to this point wasn’t easy. At her one year physical, the pediatrician tried to offer solace by telling me, “The most difficult children often turn into the most interesting adults.” It was… Read More

Leave a Comment