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Topic Archives: Math & STEM

Mindprint Exclusive: Math Word Problem Tip Sheet

July 20, 2016

Getting started on a word problem can feel overwhelming. For some students, it’s too many words, too many numbers all at once. Use this list to help your student identify the key words that will provide important clues about which operations they will need to use. It also includes ways to identify “hidden numbers.”  

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Mindprint Exclusive: Observation Checklist for Learning Struggles

June 28, 2016

This is one of many exclusive Mindprint guides found in the FREE Parent & Teacher Resources section of the Mindprint website. We hope it makes it easier for you to identify the source of your child’s struggles. If you’re looking for more detailed insight, consider a confidential Comprehensive Mindprint. Once you know the source of a child’s difficulties, search our free Toolbox to find research-backed strategies to support a struggling learner.

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Does Your Child Have the Skills for the World Economic Forum’s “4th Industrial Revolution”?

January 28, 2016

By Mindprint Staff A new report out of the World Economic Forum last month says that over one-third of the most important workplace skills will change over the next five years. That’s a rate of change that we know our schools can’t possibly keep up with. So what’s a concerned parent to do? Not panic for starters. Parents who are pleased with their own child’s school (and surveys show that 75% of parents are satisfied) need first and foremost to continue to support their children’s academic learning. Historically, schools have focused on teaching students content knowledge, leaving career skills for on-the-job training. It’s not necessarily the wrong approach. Foundation skills such as vocabulary, reading comprehension, math, and factual knowledge in history, science and social studies are the essential building blocks for… Read More

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Vintage Ed Mom: Summer Math II

May 29, 2015

By Sarah Maraniss Vander Schaaff Last week, we had homeschooling mom and blogger Cait Fitz, (My Little Poppies) share some great ideas for integrating math skills into your summer days with the kids at home. This week, we’re reposting a blog I did a few years ago with a math teacher who has “seen it all.” Many of her students, most of whom have learning differences, benefit from summer school, but you may find integrating math into day-to-day activities is enough to keep skills and motivation going strong. We hope you find her advice useful, and as with all things, frame it in the context of your own child’s needs. Questions for our math teacher:   1. Any thoughts you wish… Read More

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10 Creative Ways to Sharpen Summer Math Skills

May 22, 2015

Today we feature a guest blog from Cait Fitz, a school psychologist, homeschooling parent, and the voice behind the blog, My Little Poppies. We asked her to give us some pointers to make summer math fun. One year ago, we found ourselves suddenly, unexpectedly, homeschooling our eldest son. I knew it was the right path for our family, but the thought of teaching math filled me with my math anxiety of old. I’ll never forget the moment that those fears were squelched. It was Memorial Day weekend last year and we were spending the holiday at my parents’ condo in the mountains. Well, my parents’ place is on a small golf course – which had yet to open for the season- and… Read More

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Learn Something New Everyday: Cognitive March Madness

March 22, 2015

By Sarah Maraniss Vander Schaaff We’ve had an exciting week on this blog, with a team of bloggers joining me in our drive to “learn something new everyday.” Can you imagine if the energy and money that went into sports commentary were put towards educational programs, or if we had a 24-hour cable network with the pizzazz of ESPN devoted to the issues parents cope with in raising kids? In case you missed it, here’s a recap of what we’ve featured this week.   1. Benefits of Music for Children with Attention Issues This well-received post was written by Nicole Davies with follow-up commentary by a Mindprint Learning educator with years of experience teaching special education.       2. All… Read More

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Not your Typical College Day: Transform this Camaro

March 19, 2015

Kaylie Crosby is the project manager overseeing a team of 134. Using the special technology of the auto industry, VDP (Vehicle Development Process) she and her team of engineers are working on making a Chevrolet Camaro more fuel-efficient while “retaining the vehicle’s performance, safety, and consumer appeal.” Kaylie’s a fourth year student at the University of Alabama. Yes, she’s still in college. While some of the work on this multimillion-dollar project is integrated into course work, the large majority of it is in addition to her studies in the University of Alabama’s 5-year STEM path to the MBA program. I spoke with her on the phone a few days ago to learn more about what this mechanical engineer and her classmates are… Read More

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Let’s Here it for Pi

March 13, 2015

By Sarah Vander Schaaff March 14 is Pi Day and Albert Einstein’s birthday. For a town like Princeton, it’s a particularly special moment in time with the date, 3.14.15 coinciding with the digits in the irrational, never-ending digits in pi: 3.14159…. And if there was ever a celebration of the inquisitive, intellectual, mathematical and academic, this is it. The official party in this college town (also called Einstein’s alley) is Saturday, but set your alarm clocks, folks. The party starts at 7am. It starts with a Walk a Pi Day, (yes, that’s 3.14 miles), then, there’s a Pie Eating Contest, An Einstein look a like contest; A 9.86 bike tour (3.14×3.14), but perhaps the most dramatic event takes place at 1pm… Read More

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Do they shed tears with those timed math quizzes? Here’s help.

January 30, 2015

Never The First to Finish: Why Pace Matters By Sarah Maraniss Vander Schaaff.  This post originally appeared on the Getting Smart website as part of a series of blogs written by parents called, “Smart Parents.” Remember how it felt to be halfway through a math quiz and a classmate gets up and turns it in to the teacher? Maybe that other student rushed, or maybe he or she just happened to be super speedy. Either way, I always came to the same conclusion: I’m just never going to be that fast. Years have passed since I’ve had to take a math quiz. As an adult, I’m comfortable with my own strengths and weaknesses and the time it takes me to do… Read More

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Know your Child: Spatial Perception

December 9, 2014

How the experts define spatial perception This is the mind’s ability to process material that is visual or exists in a spatial array such as maps, graphs, or symbols. It may be called spatial relations or visual-spatial perception and is part of the complex reasoning domain of cognitive skills. In the shoes of a child with a spatial perception weakness In many cases, this weakness doesn’t become a problem until the skill is needed for a very specific task, such as drawing, reading graphs or maps, or working with geometric figures. Because students typically do not rely on these skills throughout the school day, or they are very important in one math unit but far less important in the next… Read More

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